U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Reports

Reports

Report

This paper marks the third in a series of reports that we will be releasing this fall, each taking a substantive look at what might have happened in the past – or could happen in the future – if certain energy-related ideas and policy prescriptions put forth by prominent politicians and their supporters were actually adopted. We’re calling it the Energy Accountability Series. Certainly, one doesn’t need to look far these days to find platforms or outlets that claim to be definitive “fact-checkers” of all manner of utterances candidates make on the campaign trail.

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America’s relatively recent energy revolution has fundamentally transformed the way we find, access, transport, and consume the energy resources that power our economy. Moving from an Era of Energy Scarcity to an Era of Energy Abundance has caught many by surprise and upended global energy markets.

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What if energy production was banned on federal lands and waters? It would be devastating to the U.S. and particularly felt in states like Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico, as well as the Gulf of Mexico region.

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In May 2016, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) issued its Annual Energy Outlook 2016, which includes model runs with and without the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP) final rule. The EIA analysis provides an independent look of the impacts CPP will have on the economy and energy markets in the United States.

While there are many aspects of EIA’s analysis worthy of review, this report focuses on four main areas:

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This fourth edition of the International Index of Energy Security Risk (International Index) provides an updated look at energy security risks across different countries for the years 1980 through 2014. The risk index scores calculated for the United States and 24 other countries that make up the Index’s large energy user group: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.

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How the final Clean Power Plan uses unreasonable renewable energy assumptions to increase the stringency of state emissions requirements.

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Southern California traffic is famously congested. Because population and vehicle traffic have increased at rates that greatly exceed growth in highway capacity, stifling congestion has burdened the region’s economy and quality of life for its residents. Local officials estimate that every 10 percent decrease in Los Angeles-area congestion will create 132,000 jobs.

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By: Stephen D. Eule

The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) recently released Synthesis report on the aggregate effect of the intended nationally determined contributions, its stab at analyzing the impact country pledges will have on global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

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Because population and vehicle traffic have increased at rates that greatly exceed growth in highway capacity, the Dallas-Fort Worth area now suffers from stifling traffic congestion. The North Central Texas Council of Governments has identified $95 billion of highway and transit projects necessary to alleviate the worst of the region’s congestion problems, including $40 billion for construction and expansion of freeways to accommodate additional vehicle capacity.

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The direct economic impacts of EPA’s proposed ozone regulations are well documented. According to the National Association of Manufacturers, the rule is expected to be the most expensive regulation in history, and will serve as an economic handcuff on business development in areas unable to comply with more stringent standards. As demonstrated in this report, however, the indirect transportation impacts of this rule could lead to similarly harsh consequences, as penalties for noncompliance result in the withholding of funds for critically important infrastructure improvements.